Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements

Rockin’ Yourself Asleep

Femke Dijkstra, Mineke Viaene, Inge Beijer, Harald de Cauwer

Abstract


Background: Sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder occurs frequently in childhood with a minority of patients having persistent symptoms in adolescence.

Phenomenology Shown: We describe a 14-year-old female showing a typical example of head banging at onset of sleep.

Educational Value: Sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder usually has a benign and self-limiting nature and medication might only be warranted in cases of severe sleep disruption or frequent injuries.


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