Editorial Policies

Section Policies

Articles

Full-length articles present new data in any field related to tremors or other hyperkinetic movement disorders.
  • Structured Abstract: May be up to 250 words and should contain the following sections: Background, Methods, Results, and Discussion.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 5,000 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to four tables and up to six figures. Additional tables or very lengthy tables with individual level data can also be considered as supplementary tables to the manuscript.
  • References: Up to 125 references.
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

Brief Reports

Brief reports are shorter articles that present new data. 
  • Structured Abstract: May be up to 200 words, and should be organized in this way: Background, Methods, Results, Discussion.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 2750 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to 4. (Additional tables or very lengthy tables with individual level data can also be considered as supplementary tables to the manuscript.)
  • References: Up to 50 references.  
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

Case Reports

Case reports are restricted to one or a small series of cases that make a unique point and add to the literature on a topic.
  • Structured Abstract: The structured abstract may be up to 100 words and should consist of 3 sections: Background, Case Report, and Discussion.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 1750 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to three tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 40 references. 
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

Reviews

Clinical and basic science reviews that provide a summary are generally published upon request or after agreement with the Editor-in-Chief. Unsolicited Reviews will also be considered for publication.
  • Structured Abstract: May be up to 250 words and should consist of the following sections: Background, Methods, Results, Discussion.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 5,000 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to six tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 150 references. 
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

Viewpoints

Viewpoints that provide a position statement or that challenge conventional ideas are generally published upon request or after agreement with the Editor-in-Chief. Unsolicited Viewpoints will also be considered for publication.
  • Abstract: The abstract may be up to 250 words and there is no set structure.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 2,500 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to 3 tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 125 references.
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

Deep Brain Stimulation Case Files

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Case Files is a quarterly series that identifies clinical dilemmas and gaps in knowledge in the use of DBS surgery to treat tremor and other hyperkinetic movement disorders. Each piece is commissioned by the journal editor and is centered around a clinical vignette, outlining a perplexing clinical question and reviewing the current state of published evidence available to guide clinicians. Each vignette is accompanied by an expert commentary that identifies gaps in the DBS research literature and highlights unanswered questions, in the hopes of inspiring a dialogue for new avenues of investigation in this expanding therapeutic intervention.

  • Structured Abstract: May be up to 150 words and should consist of 4 sections: Clinical Vignette, Clinical Dilemma, Clinical Solution, Gap in Knowledge.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 1750 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Up to three tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 40 references. 
  • Please note: the journal does not accept unsolicited submissions for this section.

Editorials

Editorials provide a succinct commentary linked to a specific article, highlighting one or more broader points that emerge from the work. Editorials are generally solicited by the editors and they accompany the specific article. They are not expected to present new or original data or serve as a formal rebuttal of a published letter. 
  • Abstract: No abstract needed.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 1250 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, and title page).
  • Figures/Tables: 1 table or figure.
  • References: Up to 15.
  • Highlights: The manuscript must include a summary (50 words or less) highlighting the paper's importance and main findings. This summary (labeled "Highlights") should appear as a separate page after the title page. It will be utilized if the submission is selected for inclusion in the quarterly "Editor's Picks" email.

New Observations Letters

Letters that report new observations.

  • Abstract: No abstract needed.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 1000 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, and title page). There is no set structure for the body of the manuscript.
  • Tables/Figures: Up to two tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 15 references.

Response Letters: Type 1

For letters related to previously published Articles, Case Reports, Brief Reports, and other materials, excluding letters:

  • Abstract: No abstract needed.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 1000 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, and title page). There is no set structure for the body of the manuscript.
  • Tables/Figures: Up to two tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 15 references.

Response Letters: Type 2

For letters related to published letters. A letter related to published letters may be submitted up to 16 weeks after the letter to which it refers was published online. 

  • Abstract: No abstract needed.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 500 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, and title page). There is no set structure for the body of the manuscript.
  • Tables/Figures: Up to two tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 10 references.

Response Letters: Author Replies

For letters written by authors in response to a letter written about an article they've published.

  • Abstract: No abstract needed.
  • Text Word Count: Up to 500 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, and title page). There is no set structure for the body of the manuscript.
  • Tables/Figures: Up to two tables and/or figures.
  • References: Up to 10 references.

Video Abstracts

Video abstracts include short videos that visually illustrate a single interesting phenomenon. The video should have educational value for students or practicing physicians. The emphasis should be on an examination finding (either classic or rarely seen) rather than a full presentation of a new and previously unreported type of case. The latter is more appropriately written up and submitted as a case report.

  • Structured Abstract: Should consist of three sentences: Background (one sentence), Phenomenology Shown (one sentence), Educational Value (one sentence). 
  • Text Word Count: Up to 400 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Tables/Figures: Generally no tables or figures are allowed unless they provide vital scientific information that cannot be presented in any other format.
  • Video: We allow one video file of no more than three minutes. File specifications: .mp4, H.264 encoding, 5000 kbps or 1000 kbps. 
  • References: Up to 3 references are allowed.

Conference Proceedings

This section contains both condensed conference proceedings and meeting abstracts.

  • Structured Abstract: Abstract should consist of the following sections: Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion. 
  • Text Word Count: Text length can be up to 600 words.
  • Tables/Figures: One table or figure per abstract is permitted and should be submitted in the Word document along with the text.
  • References: Up to 5 references. 

Teaching NeuroImages

This section features patient photographs, radiologic images, or other pictorial material that illustrate interesting or rare movement disorder phenomenology. 

  • Structured Abstract: Should consist of three sentences: Background (one sentence), Phenomenology Shown (one sentence), Educational Value (one sentence). 
  • Text Word Count: Up to 400 words (excluding references, tables, figure legends, video legends, title page, and abstract).
  • Figures/Tables: Up to 2 images. Each image may have more than one panel, but they should be clear and legible, and of sufficient size. Images may take up 2 full columns and half a page in PDF format, or two images may take up one column each.  For best reproduction, electronic artwork files must be in TIFF or JPG format, at a resolution of 300 dpi for black and white or color images, or 600 dpi or higher for lined art, flow charts, and spiral images, sized to print.
  • References: Up to 3 references.

Peer Review Process

Despite the journals rapid turnaround time from submission to initial decision, the peer review process for TOHM is detailed and rigorous as explained below.

Receipt of all manuscripts will immediately be electronically acknowledged by the journal editorial office, and authors have the ability on the journal website to track the progress of their submission through the peer review process. All submitted manuscripts are reviewed initially by a TOHM editor. Manuscripts that are unsuitable (e.g., absence of a message that is important to the readers of the journal) are rejected promptly. The remaining articles (>90%) are sent to experts for peer review. All submissions are evaluated by at least two such anonymous reviewers; the number of peer reviewers per manuscript ranges from 2 to 5 depending on the complexity of the topic (the average number is 3). Manuscripts that have made it through the first round of review generally received an additional 1-2 rounds of review. All reviewers are carefully selected from the editorial board and from a database of several hundred peer reviewers who are not on the editorial board. All reviewers are assigned directly by the Editor-in-Chief rather than associate editors or staff.

Authors are required to provide the names of at least three suitable peer reviewers, although this does not guarantee that one of these reviewers will be asked to serve as a reviewer. Peer reviewer identities are kept confidential, but author identities are made known to reviewers. The existence of a manuscript under review is not revealed to anyone other than peer reviewers and editorial staff. Reviews and decisions on manuscripts in which the editor is a co-author are managed independently by another editor.

If the submission is considered meritorious based on its originality and quality, authors are asked to revise their papers in response to the reviewers' comments. The revised papers are then re-reviewed for content. The final decision to accept or reject a manuscript is made by the Editor-in-Chief. In all matters concerning the publication of articles, the decision of the Editor-in-Chief will be final.

After acceptance, proofs will be sent to the corresponding author who should read them carefully for errors. A corrected copy must be returned to the Publisher within 48 hours of receipt.

Open Access Policy

This is an open access journal which means that all content is freely available without charge to the user or his/her institution. Authors maintain copyright, and all articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution–Noncommercial–No Derivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND) License. This license permits the user to copy, distribute, and transmit the work provided that the original authors and source are credited; that no commercial use is made of the work; and that the work is not altered or transformed.

Editorial Board

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Elan D. Louis, M.D., M.S., Yale University (United States), submissions@tremorjournal.org

ASSOCIATE EDITOR, REVIEWS AND VIEWPOINTS

Ruth H. Walker, M.B., Ch.B., Ph.D., James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States), ruth.walker@mssm.edu  

EDITORIAL BOARD

Alberto Albanese, M.D., Istituto Nazionale Neurologicao, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore “Carlo Besta” (Italy)

Martin Bareš, M.D., Ph.D., Masaryk University (Czech Republic)

Julian Benito-Leon, M.D., Ph.D., Hospital “12 de Octubre” (Spain)

Alfredo Berardelli, M.D., Sapienza Universita Di Roma (Italy)

Susan Bressman, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine (United States)

Francisco Cardoso, M.D., Medical School of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil)

John Caviness, M.D., Mayo Clinic School of Medicine (United States)

Maria Fiorella Contarino, M.D., Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center, Haga Teaching Hospital (The Netherlands)

William Dauer, M.D., University of Michigan (United States)

Okan Doğu, M.D., Mersin University (Turkey)

Dirk Dressler, M.D., Ph.D., Hannover Medical School (Germany)

Rodger Elble, M.D., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University (United States)

Jennifer Friedman, M.D., University of California, San Diego (United States)

Steven Frucht, M.D., Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)

Alexandre Gironell, M.D., Ph.D., Sant Pau Hospital (Spain)

Mark Hallett, M.D., National Institutes of Health (United States)

Dietrich Haubenberger, M.D., National Institutes of Health (United States)

Peter Hedera, M.D., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University (United States)

Rick Helmich, M.D., Ph.D., Radboud University Medical Centre (The Netherlands)

Joseph Jankovic, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine (United States)

Felix Javier Jiménez, M.D., Universidad de Alcala (Spain)

Hyder Jinnah, M.D., Ph.D., Emory University (United States)

Manju Kurian, MRCPCH, Ph.D., University College London (United Kingdom)

Roger Kurlan, M.D., Atlantic Health Neuroscience Institute (United States)

Mark LeDoux, M.D., Ph.D., University of Tennessee (United States)

Elizabeth McCusker, M.D., Westmead Hospital (Australia)

Michael Okun, M.D., University of Florida (United States)

William Ondo, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine (United States)

Pramod Pal, M.D., D.M., National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (India)

Seth Pullman, M.D., Columbia University (United States)

E. K. Tan, M.D., Singapore General Hospital (Singapore)

A.-Fleur van Rootselaar, M.D., Ph.D., Academic Medical Center (The Netherlands)

Marie Vidailhet, M.D., Hospital de la Salpêtrière (France)

Arthur S. Walters, M.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (United States)

Anne Young, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

Theresa Zesiewicz, M.D., University of South Florida (United States)

Ethical Principles

A.  General Statement:

TOHM adheres to the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Code of Conduct as well as the COPE Guidelines.

B. Consent-Ethical Standards:

For human studies, consent must be obtained from the patient or relatives. Studies should be performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki (1964). Authors must verify that written consent has been obtained when details that could lead to the identification of a patient are given. Principles of laboratory animal care need to be followed for animal experiments.

TOHM requires authors to register all clinical trials in a public registry at or before the time of first patient enrollment. Clinical trials may be registered in any public registry, though TOHM suggests utilizing those recommended by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The ICMJE recommends registering with any of the primary registries listed within the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), or via ClinicalTrials.gov, a registry provided by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Authors must include the trial registration number within manuscripts submitted to the journal. Registration numbers should be referenced (1) within the Methods section and (2) the first time an acronym is used to refer to the trial within the body of the manuscript. 

More information can be found on the ICMJE's Clinical Trial Registration page.

C. Patient Anonymity and Informed Consent:

It is the author’s responsibility to ensure that a patient’s anonymity be carefully protected and to verify that any experimental investigation with human subjects reported in the manuscript was performed with informed consent and following all the guidelines for experimental investigation with human subjects required by the institution(s) with which all the authors are affiliated.

D. Policy Regarding Inappropriate Submissions and Publications:

The editors, members of the editorial board, and publisher's staff at TOHM take their responsibility seriously to assure that the highest ethical publishing standards are maintained by assisting in safeguarding the medical scientific literature against fraudulent publications. Examples of fraud in scientific research include (but are not limited to):

1) The submission of duplicate publications using similar data (i.e., attesting that work submitted is original when, in fact, it was submitted to or accepted by another journal);

2) Falsification of data, copyright, or information regarding conflict of interest;

3) Submission of work from other sources that was not done by the author and is presented as a new and original (plagiarism);

4) Authorship (allowing one's name to appear as an author or adding an author to a manuscript) without substantial input or without having agreed to submission of the manuscript.

The above examples are not meant to be a comprehensive list of fraudulent publication practices. Rather, they should provide adequate basis for careful consideration of avoidable conflicts and editorial scrutiny regarding inappropriate preparation and submission of manuscripts.

If there are questions as to any issues regarding inappropriate submission, the Editor should be consulted prior to the submission. If a submitted or published manuscript is discovered or suspected to be inappropriate, the authors will be asked for a written explanation. If the rationale provided by the authors remains unsatisfactory in the judgment of the editors, the manuscript will be rejected or retracted. Retractions become a matter of public record and are registered in Pub Med. The provost (or equivalent) of the authors' academic institutions will be informed of inappropriate submissions or publications, and the authors will not be allowed to subsequently submit their research to TOHM.

Clinical Trial Registration

Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements requires authors to register all clinical trials in a public registry at or before the time of first patient enrollment. Clinical trials may be registered in any public registry, though TOHM suggests utilizing those recommended by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The ICMJE recommends registering with any of the primary registries listed within the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), or via ClinicalTrials.gov, a registry provided by the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Authors must include the trial registration number within manuscripts submitted to the journal. Registration numbers should be referenced (1) within the Methods section and (2) the first time an acronym is used to refer to the trial within the body of the manuscript.

More information can be found on the ICMJE's Clinical Trial Registration page.

How to Cite Your Article

TOHM's citation format is [Author(s) Last Name, First Initial]. [Title of article]. [Journal Abbreviation]. [year];[volume]. doi: [doi number].

The DOI is a unique identifier that relates specifically to the cited article and acts as a permanent URL.

This citation format looks like this:

Lageman SK, Cash TV, Mickens MN. Patient-reported needs, non-motor symptoms, and quality of life in essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2014; 4. doi: 10.7916/D8RF5S4J

 

Data Policy

Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements honors the principles of replication and extension of work inherent in the scientific endeavor by requesting that authors make available to others the materials and data supporting the conclusions of the paper, along with the associated protocols and computer codes necessary to understand and assess the work. In the spirit of open access we encourage our authors to make every reasonable effort to meet reader requests for protocols, materials, data and computer codes, following publication of the manuscript. 

Authors may choose to share data sets and computer codes via public repositories. Repositories accepting data and codes for deposit often generate unique identifiers for theses objects, such as a DOI, which may be used when citing datasets and codes in the paper and including them in the reference list. Where possible, cite these items using linkable, permanent URIs. 

During the review and publication process, including after publication, the editors reserve the right to request any of this information. Refusal to honor these requests may negatively affect the publication schedule or result in revocation of acceptance.

Repositories recommended by TOHM:

Academic Commons: Columbia University's digital repository, where all Tremor articles are already deposited. Authors who publish in Tremor may also deposit the data supporting these publications here.

Neuroscience Information Framework: NIF is the largest searchable collection of neuroscience data, the largest catalog of biomedical resources, and the largest ontology for neuroscience on the web.

Dryad: Data Dryad is a multidisciplinary repository where data underlying scholarly publications is made discoverable, accessible, understandable, freely reusable, and citable for all users. 

 

Why Fees?

Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements (TOHM) is committed to making a sustainable contribution to the field of movement disorders neurology by providing cutting-edge content to as many readers as possible. As an open-access journal, TOHM’s content is available to everyone — clinicians, practitioners, scientists, patients, the lay public — without the prohibitive onus of subscription fees. Open access ensures constant availability to the material regardless of institutional affiliation. Therefore there is immediate, worldwide, barrier-free access to the full-text of all of our published articles. In this manner, open access allows any interested reader to view, download, print, and redistribute any article, thereby enabling far greater distribution of an author's work than the traditional subscription-based publishing model.

In an open access model, the article’s publication costs are paid from an author's research budget, or by their supporting institution, in the form of Article Processing Charges (APCs). LikeTOHM, other open access medical journals often require APCs to enable research articles to be made freely available to all. For example, The British Medical Journal, one of the top-ranked journals in the world, charges a $4000 APC to grant-funded authors. Another top-ranked journal,PLoS Medicine, which is fully open access, charges $2900 per article, and BMC Medicine, also ranked among the top journals, charges $2255. PLoS ONE, now the largest journal in the world, charges an APC of $1325. Other movement disorders journals that use an open access model charge more than TOHM (e.g., Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders = $2,145, Frontiers in Movement Disorders = $1,900, and Parkinson’s Disease = $1,200).

TOHM has kept its APC very low, and only charges fees to cover the cost of operation to ensure the quality and the persistent availability of its content.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License.

The opinions expressed within this journal do not necessarily reflect those of Tremor, its staff, its advisory Boards, or affiliates, or those of Columbia University.